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How Does PES 2019 Look as We Approach the Transfer Window?

PES 2019

How Does PES 2019 Look as We Approach the Transfer Window?

Coming off a universally popular demo, PES 2019 released in September to fairly positive reviews. Once the initial excitement wore off, the flaws began to stick out like a sore thumb. Repetitive and predictable attacking AI, a stale Master League, and a game that just felt like it was released a little bit before it was ready. To the company’s credit, Konami recognized the feedback from the community and took its time in addressing them, ultimately releasing a huge gameplay patch in late October.

Fast forward a few months and it’s time to address the current state of PES 2019.

Perhaps the biggest issue with PES 2019 on release was the highly predictable attacking AI. Spamming the wings and refusing to shoot from distance, the AI fell into predictable patterns to the point where games became frustratingly boring as nearly all the clubs played the same no matter if it was Manchester City or Colo Colo. After nearly 100 matches post patch, I still see the majority of clubs attacking via the wings, albeit the final delivery is not always comprised of low crosses. One-two sequences played over the top with fullbacks and wingers are still abused with fullbacks falling for it nearly every time. Furthermore, the CPU virtually never fires long-range shots.

Keepers are improved in terms of closing down angles and do a better job at coming off their line, but they still suffer from the odd gaffe. More concerning is the lack of awareness displayed by your CPU teammates when it comes to 50-50 balls. Too many times your teammate will completely ignore a ball entering his radius in favor of getting back into the defensive shape. For teams that press high up the pitch, this is a huge issue as your players will often sprint back to your own half immediately after losing possession. This lack of awareness still shows up in player switching and pass recognition, which has been broken for quite some time now.

Perhaps more frustrating is the poor CPU managerial AI. Not only do CPU managers never change formations after Konami has set many up to fail tactically, they switch to overly aggressive attacking mentalities that result in the game becoming an end-to-end track meet, bypassing the midfield and resulting in ridiculously high scorelines. Nowhere is this more evident than in Master League derby matches where the scorelines can get out of hand if you play anything longer than a 10-minute match. Defending in general seems to have gotten worse as your players feel less responsive to button commands (teammate pressure), and often find themselves pulled out of position by quirky movements/animations.

Gameplay aside, it’s now a few weeks out from the new year, and we’re still waiting on the DLC that will update the game with Celtic Park and the Ibrox, two stadiums promised to be included in the game at some point, which is taking way longer than fans expected. Apart from that, Konami has done a good job of keeping up with weekly ratings. However, with the January transfer window also arriving soon, we’ll see how on top of things Konami is considering the struggles in the past.

As is the case with a lot of sports games these days, PES 2019 released with some annoying gameplay issues, as well as modes that lack depth and partners not yet included in the game. While the most recent patch was highly anticipated, it failed to breathe life into a game that is short on oxygen. Those who exercised patience with their purchasing decision aren’t missing much, and at this point PES 2019 is only worthy of a purchase if you can find it on sale.

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  1. Curious, why weren't the modding capabilities mentioned for PC/PS4 users? On those systems, the game is completely different with the help of a few option files and/or mods.
    I'm still a little upset about the lack of SPL stadiums, but now that we have an official release date from Konami (February), I'm a little less upset.
    The amount of people that play on PC and actually use mods is so small that  modding of anything is rarely mentioned on OS.  I have been a member on here for over a decade and have always thought it would be  great to see some articles about modded games. I think most people don’t even realize what’s possible.
    I have been modding or playing with mods for probably 10 years and  PES 19 is one of the best examples of how insanely better a game can be with mods. It’s quite litterally barely even the same game .
    CujoMatty
    The amount of people that play on PC and actually use mods is so small that *modding of anything is rarely mentioned on OS. *I have been a member on here for over a decade and have always thought it would be *great to see some articles about modded games. I think most people don’t even realize what’s possible.
    I have been modding or playing with mods for probably 10 years and *PES 19 is one of the best examples of how insanely better a game can be with mods. It’s quite litterally barely even the same game .

    Exactly! I'm always trying to tell people the power of mods in PES turns the game into a completely different experience. For example, every negative thing mentioned in the article can be fixed by a gameplay CPK. I'm seeing long shots, whipped/lofty crosses, working the ball into the box, and more.
    Cod
    Curious, why weren't the modding capabilities mentioned for PC/PS4 users? On those systems, the game is completely different with the help of a few option files and/or mods.

    For the same reason that no one is going to bring up a fan edit of a Star Wars movie in defense of the original film. People needing mods to make a game play well is a pretty big indictment of the game, actually.
    dubcity
    For the same reason that no one is going to bring up a fan edit of a Star Wars movie in defense of the original film. People needing mods to make a game play well is a pretty big indictment of the game, actually.

    I disagree as I'm not sure I understand your logic. How are mods different than people downloading custom sliders and rosters? They're not, yet, most people who play any sports game will download those. Both can have the same effect on gameplay as a specific gameplay mod.
    So should a review only be based on the "out-of-the-box" product since not everyone has an internet connection? Or should it be based on the base product plus what's available? In my opinion, a review should be based on the later.
    Cod
    I disagree as I'm not sure I understand your logic. How are mods different than people downloading custom sliders and rosters? They're not, yet, most people who play any sports game will download those. Both can have the same effect on gameplay as a specific gameplay mod.
    So should a review only be based on the "out-of-the-box" product since not everyone has an internet connection? Or should it be based on the base product plus what's available? In my opinion, a review should be based on the later.
    We're talking about mods that edit the actual source code of the game. I see that as different than custom rosters or sliders. Rosters and sliders are way more limited when it comes to actually edit what's under the hood of these games.
    ON PS4 it's a disappointment especially for players like me who play Master League. The gameplay glitches, irregularities are not fixed and there are problems with Master League mechanics as well. I'd be okay with ML problems if gameplay didn't have such problems but gameplay problems persist even after the gameplay update released by Konami in November.
    Cod
    I disagree as I'm not sure I understand your logic. How are mods different than people downloading custom sliders and rosters? They're not, yet, most people who play any sports game will download those. Both can have the same effect on gameplay as a specific gameplay mod.
    So should a review only be based on the "out-of-the-box" product since not everyone has an internet connection? Or should it be based on the base product plus what's available? In my opinion, a review should be based on the later.

    When I review games for OS I only review them based on how they play out of the box. I’ll make sure to let readers know that there are options which can enhance their enjoyment of the game but unless it’s something widely accessible across all platforms I don’t think it’s right to judge the game based off mods. It’s not an OS policy or anything, just my personal attempt to judge the game based on how the majority of consumers purchase it.
    Don’t get me wrong, mods on the PC fix a lot of issues (licenses, presentation packages, gameplay bugs, etc...) but they’re usually not available at the time of release anyway. I’ve seen some incredible mods and I’m jealous of how they enhance the experience but not enough to drop coins on buying a gaming pc ha.
    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Yeah, if we're throwing mods into the equation then I'm guessing it becomes impossible to rate or review just about any game. On PC anyway, for PS4 gamers like myself it's a non-issue.
    2019 was the first time that I preordered PES ahead of FIFA. And while I can't say I totally regret the decision, the whole SPL ordeal does leave a bad taste in my mouth. PES 2020 will probably go back to a Black Friday special.
    I'll be waiting until the price drops before considering buying PES2020, assuming it's worth buying at all. Not willing to hand over £35 to Konami any more, given how little the game develops each year - other than graphics, it's regressed this year, imo, particularly the AI and gameplay.
    If you haven't bought it for about 3 years, so are getting 3 years worth of Konami-sized development, it's worth about £15. Buying on an annual basis, it's worth about £5.

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