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NASCAR Driver Bubba Wallace Rage Quits iRacing Event Over the Weekend

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NASCAR Driver Bubba Wallace Rage Quits iRacing Event Over the Weekend

FOX Sports teamed up with NASCAR and iRacing, a couple of weeks ago, to deliver the eNASCAR iRacing Pro Invitational Series events. These events feature NASCAR drivers and a broadcasting booth featuring Jeff Gordon, Mike Joy and Larry McReynolds. So, this isn’t your average, every day, race with you and a few of your online buddies.

The eNASCAR iRacing Pro Invitational Series event, over the weekend, featured a meltdown by Bubba Wallace, as he rage quit the race just a few laps in.

Oh, it’s better watching it from the “Bubba Cam”.

Bubba wasn’t having it with his Twitter mentions either…

And neither was one of his sponsors…

In the end, William Byron took home the checkered flag. You can get a recap at the official iRacing website.

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  1. I feel with sponsors paying/donating money for these events and Las Vegas allowing bets for these races, Bubba should have taken a better attitude to this race.
    Part of the reason so many of the "serious" sim racers are taking this as a slap in the face. They understand that people aren't interested in seeing guys they've never heard of race, but very few of the pros take it seriously. Why would they?
    Not to mention, being a pro driver doesn't instantly translate to being fast in a sim. With no seat-of-the-pants feel, no G-forces...you have to translate all of the information from the car through the force feedback in the wheel, which is a learned skill.
    Most of the hardcore sim guys are consistently faster than the "real" guys, because it's just a totally different skill set, even though it LOOKS the same. But nobody would want to watch a bunch of no-names smoke the real guys, and that's totally understandable.
    The good thing to come out of this is exposure--there are more new sim racers joining the Discord community I'm in currently than at any time in the past. Guys see their drivers on TV, and had no idea this sort of thing existed. I've answered questions on what kind of PC to get, what wheel/pedals to use, etc., more in the past few weeks than I had in the past year before that.
    For that, it's great. For the racing...it's not taken very seriously at any level by guys who aren't invested in it and are just trying it for the first time in many cases.
    No mention of Suarez? :)
    Anyway, seems like a questionable decision by whomever is choosing the tracks. Bristol and now I’m hearing Richmond? Really? They would be better served to try and limit short-tracks since they tend to cause the most chaos. Also, single file starts and restarts is probably the way to go. It will perhaps be less competitive but maybe, just maybe, it will result in less cautions.
    It's a testament to the realism of the simulation for these professional drivers to become as incensed over a "racing incident" in it as they would IRL. I'm enjoying watching the less familiar with iracing drivers become more familiar with it and getting demonstrably better. I had a feeling the Bristol race was going to be a yellow flag fest, and it went about as expected. It and Martinsville are the two toughest tracks in which I've ever raced humans. On the rare occasions in which I race either of those tracks in multiplayer, my goal is to simply finish the race with as little damage as possible. Every now and then I'll get a top ten finish through attrition, but I'm never fast at these tracks.
    RunN1st
    No mention of Suarez? :)
    Anyway, seems like a questionable decision by whomever is choosing the tracks. Bristol and now I’m hearing Richmond? Really? They would be better served to try and limit short-tracks since they tend to cause the most chaos. Also, single file starts and restarts is probably the way to go. It will perhaps be less competitive but maybe, just maybe, it will result in less cautions.

    It's following the real Cup schedule, where they should have been racing, these tracks have sponsor deals, and those same sponsors are the race title sponsor for these.
    The issue is that half the field just got sim rigs, and the other half have been on iRacing for years. No matter how good you are, if you go from real to sim, you are not going to understand how to translate what you are seeing into what you usually feel. Thats why when real racers talk about sims/games that never actually sim/race, its usually all BS (like most of what is coming out of Jeff Gordon's mouth during these races)
    The spacial awareness seems to be the hardest part for these guys to figure out, its the internet, cars racing around a 15 second lap track tend to need more space, which most of the field doesn't understand. It's not a game limit, but speed of light limit, as the game tries to predict where the car next to you will be before it gets the info back. The real drivers don't understand this, and because of how realistic it is, don't give space for that error in prediction code like most sim racers do.
    Now Clint was just racing like an idiot all day, so I understand why Bubba was pissed, but Bubba was also getting paid to represent his team and a new sponsor, and failed to do so when he left, even though he had resets left.
    Richmond will be better, super speedways will be terrible, its just these guy's lack of awareness on how online racing contact and gaps work compared to real life. The best sim racers put on a great race at Bristol with 40 cars on track.
    kneebon5
    It's following the real Cup schedule, where they should have been racing, these tracks have sponsor deals, and those same sponsors are the race title sponsor for these.
    The issue is that half the field just got sim rigs, and the other half have been on iRacing for years. No matter how good you are, if you go from real to sim, you are not going to understand how to translate what you are seeing into what you usually feel. Thats why when real racers talk about sims/games that never actually sim/race, its usually all BS (like most of what is coming out of Jeff Gordon's mouth during these races)
    The spacial awareness seems to be the hardest part for these guys to figure out, its the internet, cars racing around a 15 second lap track tend to need more space, which most of the field doesn't understand. It's not a game limit, but speed of light limit, as the game tries to predict where the car next to you will be before it gets the info back. The real drivers don't understand this, and because of how realistic it is, don't give space for that error in prediction code like most sim racers do.
    Now Clint was just racing like an idiot all day, so I understand why Bubba was pissed, but Bubba was also getting paid to represent his team and a new sponsor, and failed to do so when he left, even though he had resets left.
    Richmond will be better, super speedways will be terrible, its just these guy's lack of awareness on how online racing contact and gaps work compared to real life. The best sim racers put on a great race at Bristol with 40 cars on track.

    I see on the schedule.
    Jeff Gordon is just spewing BS or he knows something we don’t. LOL
    Watching the race this weekend reminded me so much of the NR2003 public lobby races where people would use real driver names and ended up being horrible. I’m now thinking that they may have been real drivers! Ha!
    Another iRacing subscriber here. I won't say 'racer' cuz that's what Terry is, not me LOL. Cheers Terry :cheers444
    NETCODE, what kneebon5 said here can't be overstated, especially for short tracks and superspeedway/pack racing.
    kneebon5

    The spacial awareness seems to be the hardest part for these guys to figure out, its the internet, cars racing around a 15 second lap track tend to need more space, which most of the field doesn't understand. It's not a game limit, but speed of light limit, as the game tries to predict where the car next to you will be before it gets the info back. The real drivers don't understand this, and because of how realistic it is, don't give space for that error in prediction code like most sim racers do.

    Essentially yes, they ARE learning, and it seems many of the teams are putting the time in during the week, but short track races, and contact in general, is something these guys are still learning about. They have commented that the cars go out of control easier than the real ones do, and they need to compensate for years of doing it for real to what this is.
    I know they are sticking to the schedule, but I think the short tracks and superspeedways will continue to be problematic. I think the 'regular' ovals like Vegas, California, Charlotte, Kentucky, etc will provide the best racing...perhaps even Pocono. Spacing is much less of an issue there, and the Texas race was great!
    I love how seriously the teams are taking this, putting the engineers to work with the drivers during the week practicing.
    Obviously the sponsors are also taking this seriously, and I like that. This is their opportunity to get their brand seen on a car in a race, virtual or otherwise. Bubba quitting out like that, (Bowyer or no) was the wrong move and following up that with his posts on Twitter :wedgie: All it did was send a bad message all around to sponsors, fans, NASCAR, FOX and the other drivers. It's a manly sport, taking your ball and going home is not the way to go.
    Finally, I (and the drivers and commentators) do love how it looks and is presented in the broadcasts! Great angles and editing/production from iRacing and FOX. I am looking forward to more, but sad there likely won't be another 'standard' oval race on the Pro Invitational schedule for this.
    If blue emu wants to sponsor me to play a NASCAR video game they can wreck me as many times as they want and I'll keep driving.  
    Lieutenant Dan
    Another iRacing subscriber here. I won't say 'racer' cuz that's what Terry is, not me LOL. Cheers Terry :cheers444
    NETCODE, what kneebon5 said here can't be overstated, especially for short tracks and superspeedway/pack racing.
    Essentially yes, they ARE learning, and it seems many of the teams are putting the time in during the week, but short track races, and contact in general, is something these guys are still learning about. They have commented that the cars go out of control easier than the real ones do, and they need to compensate for years of doing it for real to what this is.
    I know they are sticking to the schedule, but I think the short tracks and superspeedways will continue to be problematic. I think the 'regular' ovals like Vegas, California, Charlotte, Kentucky, etc will provide the best racing...perhaps even Pocono. Spacing is much less of an issue there, and the Texas race was great!
    I love how seriously the teams are taking this, putting the engineers to work with the drivers during the week practicing.
    Obviously the sponsors are also taking this seriously, and I like that. This is their opportunity to get their brand seen on a car in a race, virtual or otherwise. Bubba quitting out like that, (Bowyer or no) was the wrong move and following up that with his posts on Twitter :wedgie: All it did was send a bad message all around to sponsors, fans, NASCAR, FOX and the other drivers. It's a manly sport, taking your ball and going home is not the way to go.
    Finally, I (and the drivers and commentators) do love how it looks and is presented in the broadcasts! Great angles and editing/production from iRacing and FOX. I am looking forward to more, but sad there likely won't be another 'standard' oval race on the Pro Invitational schedule for this.

    Kyle Busch’s progress, in particular, has been crazy.
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