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FIFA 22 Adds Exclusive Partnership With Serie A, Plus Other License Updates

FIFA 22 Serie A

FIFA 22

FIFA 22 Adds Exclusive Partnership With Serie A, Plus Other License Updates

As we get closer to the release of FIFA 22, it’s been oddly quiet on the licensing front from EA. In the past, both Konami and EA have been interlocked in a battle to secure partnerships. Whether it be with domestic leagues or official clubs, EA has always taken a more aggressive approach locking up several high profile licenses such as the English Premier League and UEFA Champions League. Konami made moves in late spring/early summer with partnerships with Italian sides AS Roma and Atalanta, leaving many to wonder what Italy’s top division would look like in FIFA 22. For FIFA 21, Serie A was the only major European domestic league without all of their teams licensed in the game and without the official broadcast package.

FIFA 22 And Serie A

For ’22, Serie A will be included in FIFA 22 with its official broadcast package, but the announcement is a little misleading considering five of the biggest clubs in Italy are exclusive to eFootball and won’t be licensed in FIFA 22:

  • Juventus – Piedmont Calcio
  • AS Roma – Roma FC
  • Atalanta – Bergamo Calcio
  • Lazio – Latium
  • Napoli – Napoli FC

Serie B, Italy’s second division is also not included in FIFA 22, which means historically relevant clubs like Parma won’t be in the game nor will there will be any relegation or promotion included. For career mode players, this is a huge omission, especially as the five clubs listed usually find themselves at or near the top of the Serie A standings every year, with Juventus being the most successful domestic club in the country. Without the ability to edit existing teams, the Edit Mode that helps to bridge the license gap between FIFA and PES would be a welcome addition to help increase the authenticity.

Where Did The Africa Teams Go?

Upon the release of the official list for all the teams that can be found in FIFA 22, there was a noticeable omission. For FIFA 22, there won’t be any African nations represented. For a game that has the official FIFA World Cup license, this is a huge blow and another strange omission by EA. Obtaining licensing for national sides has always been a tricky and confusing thing, but for no African nations to be included means those who manage a national side in career mode will have a World Cup missing at least five nations. I’m not sure how or even if EA dropped the ball as sometimes the cost to acquire a specific license outweighs its benefit. Still, this is FIFA and the World Cup is the most popular event in the world.

Brazil & Argentina Are The Only Two South American Teams Included

Another interesting development on the licensing front is what exactly is going on in South America. Club teams have historically been tricky to license, but from the looks of the list posted above, national sides look to be lacking for FIFA 22. Only two of CONMEBOL’s 10 members are in the game with the most popular footballing nation in the world, Brazil, having fake players — although you can always edit them in-game. With Argentina being the only other CONMEBOL nation included, we don’t even get to play with top national sides like Chile and Uruguay, who were included last year. The impact this has on managing Argentina and Brazil in career mode is huge. Sure they’ll be shoo-ins for the World Cup every four years, but anyone who has seen the CONMEMOL World Cup Qualifiers know how exciting those matches can be.

Over 100 Licensed Stadiums

In continuing with the yearly tradition, EA has kept pace on adding authentic stadiums. With over 100 included in FIFA 22, most of the top leagues have their first division sides with real stadiums. Historic grounds like Anfield and Dortmund’s Signal Iduna Park are done really well, especially on next-gen consoles with the added stadium atmosphere. It’s not all good as Brentford fans get the same treatment as Leeds did last year when Elland Road wasn’t added until much later in the development cycle. Brentford Community Stadium should come in early 2022, according to EA. Hopefully this isn’t going to be a running theme for newly promoted sides.

If we’re looking at the rest of Europe, we’re still a little lacking when it comes to France, which only has three albeit for the top three sides (PSG, Lyon, and Marseille) in terms of country-wide support. Despite being fully licensed now, Serie A only has the San Siro/Giuseppe Meazza included this year, most likely as a result of the exclusive deals Konami secured for eFootball. 14 of the 18 Bundesliga clubs have their stadiums in the game with the noticeable exclusion being Bayern Munich’s Allianz Arena.

Spanish stadiums are also represented well with the exception of FC Barcelona’s famous Camp Nou. Internationally, and keeping in tune with the running theme, the only true international stadium in the game is England’s Wembley Stadium. Large national team stadiums such as France’s Stade de France or Spain’s Estadio de la Cartuja are still missing, meaning that World Cup as well as UEFA Champions League Finals will rotate among stadiums that would never have a chance at hosting them in real life.

Bottom Line

Few things generate more negativity than licenses in sports games. Unfortunately, they are not going away any time soon. Even with the all of the newcomers to the soccer video gaming market, these new companies will quickly find out that a lot of their success will hinge on the ability to secure licenses. FIFA 22 overall looks strong in this department, adding the Indian Super League this year. But outside of Europe, the licenses for national teams are bleak. An Edit Mode where you could upload files similar to the one found in PES would go a long way towards filling the license void, especially in Italy where Serie A fans are missing out on a league that is gaining in popularity. We’ll see what happens with the missing African and South American nations, but if history holds true, we won’t see any updates on this end until FIFA 23 at the earliest.

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  1. What good is an official license if you're missing 5 teams with no way (on console at least) to put the real team in the game. Not like these are the sides likely to get relegated either. These are "big" clubs they don't have in the game. Missing a bunch of national teams as well is just perplexing. So they can make up fake club teams but not fake national teams.
    This game is a mess just like eFootball but just in a different way.
    Sent from my Pixel 4a (5G) using Operation Sports mobile app
    jrnlgrn
    What good is an official license if you're missing 5 teams with no way (on console at least) to put the real team in the game. Not like these are the sides likely to get relegated either. These are "big" clubs they don't have in the game. Missing a bunch of national teams as well is just perplexing. So they can make up fake club teams but not fake national teams.
    This game is a mess just like eFootball but just in a different way.
    Sent from my Pixel 4a (5G) using Operation Sports mobile app

    There is quite a few Serie B teams in ROW section in The game this year. I swapped them with the unlicensed teams in the beta.
    Now I know we are missing four real names in the Italian league, but here is what they have used & how it links to the real clubs. It doesn’t make up for them but once you know how the name links to the team it makes it better than just thinking why have they used that name.
    Okay this one doesn’t have a meaning, FC Rome just sounds like Roma in a slightly bad English translation but it’s obvious who they are
    Atalanta’s full real name is Atalanta Bergamasca Calcio, so again I can live with Bergamo Calcio and it’s where the club is also based. Also if you want, you could say Atalanta has closed due to financial reasons & they have re-established the original club before Atalanta was invented FC Bergamo. They were established in 1904, three years before Atalanta was.
    Piemonte Calcio, I know Piemonte/Piedmont is the area of which Turin is the capital & they are from, plus I’m actually now used to the name & still refer to them as Juve.
    As for SS Lazio, now I know Latium is the area that Rome sits in & the Italian word for Latium is Lazio so I can see why they used it, but they could have used SocietĂ  Sportiva, which is what the SS stands for instead.
    Now I would prefer the correct names & hopefully the four teams will come back in future games, but for now at least you have an understanding as to why these clubs are called what they are called. Apart from FC Rome which was clearly a staff meeting at 5pm on a Friday & they were all going to pub but couldn’t until they found a new name for AS Roma
    Sent from my iPhone using Operation Sports
    The exclusive rights is only beneficial to FUT, which is their money grabbing game mode. That's really all that matters to them.
    adoptedscouse
    Now I know we are missing four real names in the Italian league, but here is what they have used & how it links to the real clubs. It doesn’t make up for them but once you know how the name links to the team it makes it better than just thinking why have they used that name.
    Okay this one doesn’t have a meaning, FC Rome just sounds like Roma in a slightly bad English translation but it’s obvious who they are
    Atalanta’s full real name is Atalanta Bergamasca Calcio, so again I can live with Bergamo Calcio and it’s where the club is also based. Also if you want, you could say Atalanta has closed due to financial reasons & they have re-established the original club before Atalanta was invented FC Bergamo. They were established in 1904, three years before Atalanta was.
    Piemonte Calcio, I know Piemonte/Piedmont is the area of which Turin is the capital & they are from, plus I’m actually now used to the name & still refer to them as Juve.
    As for SS Lazio, now I know Latium is the area that Rome sits in & the Italian word for Latium is Lazio so I can see why they used it, but they could have used SocietĂ  Sportiva, which is what the SS stands for instead.
    Now I would prefer the correct names & hopefully the four teams will come back in future games, but for now at least you have an understanding as to why these clubs are called what they are called. Apart from FC Rome which was clearly a staff meeting at 5pm on a Friday & they were all going to pub but couldn’t until they found a new name for AS Roma
    Sent from my iPhone using Operation Sports

    Good post and I enjoyed the history lesson (for real!) but I don't think anyone has an issue with the actual names EA used, it's more so the fact that you can't really have an "official license" if 4-5 clubs are generic with NO way to edit them on consoles.
    I don't think there's enough hell being raised by the FIFA community about the need for a PES-like Edit Mode. I'm no lawyer but I don't think there's a legal argument to be had about why we can't change kits, rename teams, etc... if PES was doing it all these years with no legal blowback.
    Strange times indeed!
    KG
    Good post and I enjoyed the history lesson (for real!) but I don't think anyone has an issue with the actual names EA used, it's more so the fact that you can't really have an "official license" if 4-5 clubs are generic with NO way to edit them on consoles.
    I don't think there's enough hell being raised by the FIFA community about the need for a PES-like Edit Mode. I'm no lawyer but I don't think there's a legal argument to be had about why we can't change kits, rename teams, etc... if PES was doing it all these years with no legal blowback.
    Strange times indeed!

    That’s very true, we used to do it with creation centre.
    Sent from my iPhone using Operation Sports

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