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NHL 18 Features New Player Overall Rating Changes - More Player Ratings Revealed

NHL 18

NHL 18 Features New Player Overall Rating Changes - More Player Ratings Revealed

The NHL 18 team has made some changes to the player overall ratings this year, making them lower and more spread out than they have been in the past. This will widen the gap on the talent from first liners to fourth and improve franchise logic. Players will see a more defined gap between a player’s value in Franchise Mode, affecting player transactions from trades to waivers.

This will make superstars like Connor McDavid and Sidney Crosby stand out more and make it more obvious, the value they bring to their respective teams.

Top prospects like Nolan Patrick and Nico Hischier will be ready to step into the NHL straight out of the NHL Entry Draft. This allows for more authentic drafting, as generally the top picks out of every NHL Entry Draft class are able to step in and make an impact in the NHL.

Below is a general guide to how veteran NHL players fit in with their overall in NHL 18. There will be some crossover as there are players in real-life who find themselves right in between a second line forward and third line scoring forward role:

FORWARDS

  • First Line Forward = 85 OVR – 99 OVR
  • Second Line Forward = 82 OVR – 85 OVR
  • Third Line Scoring Forward = 80 OVR – 82 OVR
  • Third Line Checking Forward = 78 OVR – 80 OVR
  • Fourth Line Forward = 75 OVR – 78 OVR

DEFENSEMEN

  • Top 2 Defenseman = 87 OVR – 99 OVR
  • Top 4 Defenseman = 81 OVR – 87 OVR
  • Top 6 Defenseman = 78 OVR – 81 OVR
  • Top 8 Defenseman = 75 OVR – 78 OVR

GOALTENDERS

  • Elite Goaltender = 87 OVR – 99 OVR
  • Starting Goaltender = 82 OVR – 87 OVR
  • Backup Goaltender = 75 OVR – 82 OVR

EA has started revealing NHL 18 overall player ratings today, we will continue to update this post as they arrive, along with posting the top 10 lists separately.

  • Connor McDavid (Overall 93)
  • Sidney Crosby (Overall 93)
  • Evgeni Malkin (Overall 92)
  • Carey Price (Overall 92)
  • Alex Ovechkin (Overall 92)
  • Erik Karlsson (Overall 91)
  • Drew Doughty (Overall 91)
  • Patrick Kane (Overall 91)
  • Steven Stamkos (Overall 91)
  • John Tavares (Overall 90)
  • Vladimir Tarasenko (Overall 90)
  • Braden Holtby (Overall 90)
  • Jamie Benn (Overall 90)
  • Brent Burns (Overall 90)
  • Victor Hedman (Overall 90)
  • Duncan Keith (Overall 90)
  • Nicklas Backstrom (Overall 89)
  • Patrice Bergeron (Overall 89)
  • Ryan Getzlaf (Overall 89)
  • Tyler Seguin (Overall 89)
  • Jonathan Toews (Overall 89)
  • Nikita Kucherov (Overall 89)
  • Ryan Suter (Overall 89)
  • Shea Weber (Overall 89)
  • Sergei Bobrovsky (Overall 89)
  • Cory Schneider (Overall 89)
  • Joe Pavelski (Overall 88)
  • Kris Letang (Overall 88)
  • Roman Josi (Overall 88)
  • Alex Pietrangelo (Overall 88)
  • Matt Murray (Overall 88)
  • Henrik Lundqvist (Overall 88)
  • Devan Dubnyk (Overall 88)
  • Tuukka Rask (Overall 88)
  • Corey Crawford (Overall 87)
  • Taylor Hall (Overall 87)
  • Brad Marchand (Overall 87)
  • Johnny Gaudreau (Overall 87)
  • Max Pacioretty (Overall 87)
  • Cam Talbot (Overall 87)
  • Auston Matthews (Overall 87)
  • Blake Wheeler (Overall 87)
  • David Pastrnak (Overall 87)
  • Jakub Voracek (Overall 87)
  • Leon Draisaitl (Overall 87)
  • Jack Eichel (Overall 87)
  • Hampus Lindholm (Overall 86)
  • Rasmus Ristolainen (Overall 86)
  • Wayne Simmonds (Overall 86)
  • Patrik Laine (Overall 86)
  • Phil Kessel (Overall 86)
  • Marc-Andre Fleury (Overall 86)
  • Phil Kessell (Overall 86)
  • Artemi Panarin (Overall 86)
  • Filip Forsberg (Overall 86)
  • Eric Staal (Overall 85)
  • Gabriel Landeskog (Overall 85)
  • James Van Riemsdyk (Overall 84)
  • Mikael Backlund (Overall 84)
  • Mika Zibanejad (Overall 84)
  • Nazem Kadri (Overall 84)
  • Bo Horvat (Overall 84)
  • Adam Henrique (Overall 83)
  • Tyler Johnson (Overall 83)
  • Brendan Gallagher (Overall 82)
  • Brenden Dillon (Overall 81)
  • Chris Wideman (Overall 79)
  • Zach Hyman (Overall 79)
  • Eddie Lack (Overall 79)
  • Brock Boeser (Overall 78)
  • J.T. Brown (Overall 77)
  • Curtis Lazar (Overall 77)
  • Max Jones (Overall 68)
  • Kasimir Kaskisuo (Overall 64)

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Discussion
  1. Very good news! It was about time! More separation in player ratings was a must, so I'm really happy that it was finally integrated. I only hope though that the players differentiation will also be felt on the ice and not only showed on paper in the ratings.
    Good stuff. I was getting close to finishing the NHL player ratings for the Revamped Rosters, but now I'll have to make some adjustments. I have a feeling the overall formulas will be different this year, so hopefully someone can figure them out.
    But I agree with Al_Tito - I hope we are able to feel the differences on the ice. I want to notice the difference when my 4th line is out there vs. my 1st line.
    Sent from my iPhone using Operation Sports
    Al_Tito13
    Very good news! It was about time! More separation in player ratings was a must, so I'm really happy that it was finally integrated. I only hope though that the players differentiation will also be felt on the ice and not only showed on paper in the ratings.

    Exactly. The biggest thing to me is when I'm Crosby or McDavid, I want to feel like them on the ice and that they are a threat any time I have the puck with them. In the past when I've been Ovechkin for example, he's just felt like any other player.
    Let's see if they finally nailed it this year. I honestly don't really remember feeling it in the beta, but we will see.
    I think the reason players feel bland is because the ratings are too similar within each section. I think strengths and weaknesses need to be more distinct -- based on real data and scouting/reputation -- to give players more character.
    It shouldn't be uncommon to see a player with a good wrister, but weak slapper (Kessel) or vice versa (a lot of D-men). Nor should a player almost always have passing, puck control, and deking be the same. For me, many NHL-level defensemen today merit something like an 80-85 passing rating, but more like 75-80 control and 65-70 deking. And when it comes to awareness and defensive ratings, let's see long-time cagey vets with high AWR ratings -- and young players with lower ones (that improve over their career), particularly on DEF AWR. Drafted a slick, skilled rookie you want to play in NHL at 18? Better watch his minutes with his 60 DEF AWR, not to mention 65 STR & 70 END.
    As for skating, while I can see having a fairly narrow range of ratings at the NHL level, you can still give the players more unique feel by varying the ACC/AGL/BAL ratings within those 20 or so points (75-95). Yeah, if 80 is average NHL speed, many players will be 80-85. But a PWF-type with 85SPD/75ACC/75AGL/90BAL will feel a lot different than a smaller, quicker guy with 85SPD/90ACC/80AGL/75BAL. Then try controlling McDavid with 95SPD/95ACC/90AGL/80BAL. Really, I could do this all day...
    Anyway, the ratings brackets are encouraging and should help somewhat with franchise issues. But until there are more apparent strengths & weaknesses within the individual ratings, players will continue to feel too similar.
    bad_philanthropy
    It's a good and unexpected start. Enjoyed NHL 17 for all its warts, and actually like TPS :duck:. Looking forward to 18.

    Agreed. This is shaping up to be an improved version of 17, which is fine with me. Hopefully concepts such as player rating and separation bear fruit and aren't just advertised features that don't really impact gameplay.
    Turbojugend
    Agreed. This is shaping up to be an improved version of 17, which is fine with me. Hopefully concepts such as player rating and separation bear fruit and aren't just advertised features that don't really impact gameplay.

    It will be interesting to see indeed, but it does appear there is a concerted effort to go in a direction of differentiation between this, the difference in player skill I felt in the beta, and drafted players having a more realistic spread of ratings.
    I wonder what the overalls for ECHL and junior players will look like. I wonder if we'll finally have a spread in Jr hockey ranging from high 70's-80's (nhl ready) and 40 overalls. I've always found the CHL is a great place to test ratings differentiation using teams stacked with higher end players on their top line.
    Yeah, I'm currently playing a season in the WHL as the Seattle Thunderbirds, there's a bit more diversity in talent in that league. Scoring is difficult (for me), lots of shots go wide, especially with manual shooting. I'm getting lots of 2-1 results, which is great. Scoring four in a game is a rarity.
    Qeustion though: Isn't there already a player separation slider to increase the ability levels between high/low rated players? Has anyone tried cranking this up to its fullest to see if it makes any difference?
    those ratings are good, I just hold out hope, that's it really noticeable. am really fascinated by this move, least its start in right direction. anyone else excited by this ? :tongue:, cause I am!. it might just play brilliant this time.
    first thing am gonna do is roll out the be a pro goalie and slider and franchises setting for NHL 18. when I get my copy on September 15th.
    Just hope!, I don't have to put bigger players on front lines this time, I was really upset when I had to move bigger player on the front lines.
    With these ratings... I might just be able to do balance thing, like one or two big guys and 1 small guy or 2 small guys, for speed kinda like pittsburgh penguins, then... I add one gimungous player between 6'3 and 6'4.
    anyways am excited ! :tongue:

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