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MLB The Show 16 News Post


Perhaps unlike any other sport, roster management is a huge deal in baseball. From managing how and when to add players to the disabled list, to managing minor leagues, to simply putting together a coherent 25-man roster for the bulk of the season -- roster management is front and center when it comes to baseball.

Managing an MLB Franchise's roster means you have to constantly be monitoring multiple levels of baseball and dozens of players to make sure your roster is evolving as it should. This usually involves a delicate dance of moving players up and down the minors as well as carefully managing your 40 man roster.

If you aren't careful, you can easily find that your roster has horrible imbalances with too many of any one position on your 40 man roster. This creates an uncomfortable position of having to move players sometimes completely out of your franchise just to have a functional roster -- especially if injuries become prevalent in your franchise at a certain position.

With that in mind, what are some of the things you do to keep your roster coherent, balanced, and ready for anything? What are some roster building tips you'd like to share on how to keep things in check?

Game: MLB The Show 16Reader Score: 7.5/10 - Vote Now
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Member Comments
# 1 x LuvMESumME x @ 04/27/16 04:26 PM
I really want to know which roster everyone is using. I've heard good and bad about the new version 2 from OSFM and the 40 man version 2 Thanks for you guys input
 
# 2 24 @ 04/27/16 04:28 PM
I always make sure my bench consists of: a backup catcher, a utility infielder, a 4th outfielder and a go to Pinch hitter.
 
# 3 Ghost Of The Year @ 04/27/16 04:35 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by 24
I always make sure my bench consists of: a backup catcher, a utility infielder, a 4th outfielder and a go to Pinch hitter.
Just not enough roster spots for position players to go around, esp. for the N.L., when those pinch hitters really are invaluable. I miss the days when 10 pitchers would suffice.
Sometimes I will only carry 11 pitchers instead of 12. Anyone else do this?
 
# 4 PRiMETiME559_ps4 @ 04/27/16 05:09 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost Of The Year
Just not enough roster spots for position players to go around, esp. for the N.L., when those pinch hitters really are invaluable. I miss the days when 10 pitchers would suffice.
Sometimes I will only carry 11 pitchers instead of 12. Anyone else do this?
Playing in a Dodgers franchise, it's really easy to carry 11 pitchers instead of 12, especially when one gets hurt. Depending on the situation, and who it was that gets hurt. I took 12 pitchers into the start of the season and 13 position players. Adrian Gonzalez got hurt, which was a big blow for one month so I actually had to call up Barnes to act in a backup catcher roll, put Ellis behind the plate exclusively, Grandal at first to fill in for Gonzalez, and then when fatigue set in when I had 20 games in a row without an off day, I had to put Turner at first base, give Grandal and Ellis some days off here and there, put Culberson in at 3rd, or Kike, throw Barnes behind the plate etc. it got tough sometimes and it was very frustrating as well because Ellis went 11 straight games without a hit but there was nothing I could do guys needed days off to avoid any further injuries or silly mistakes that led to errors (which there were a lot of). Now Utley just got hurt a few games after Gonzalez came back and he's gonna be out 2-3 weeks so I actually had to call up Crawford for an extra outfielder because I needed to put Kendrick at 2B instead of LF, so I had Kike, Thompson, and Crawford as my backup guys on the bench. The Dodgers have so many guys that can play so many places, especially the infielders so it makes roster management a lot easier than most other teams. They don't play all the positions at a gold glove level and have had some game costing errors but it has gotten me through tough times more than not.
Now if a pitcher were to go down, let's say while a fielder was also hurt, depending on who got hurt in the bullpen, I might stay with the 11 in the bullpen and bring up an extra batter and really focus on using the double switch to get as many innings out of my bullpen guys as possible and thus, have enough fielders for the situation. There's nothing worse than going extra innings and having to use bullpen guys in key hitting spots because you've ran out of position players. You can always try to save a long reliever for late tie game situations if you feel it's going to go extras and make sure to use that double switch.

If I was in the American League, I would never go below 12 pitchers simply because 13 position players is enough in almost every situation because there is no need to pinch hit unless a guy is extremely struggling or an injury. I would maybe even go 13 pitchers and 12 batters if my rotation was struggling and I was looking for a go-to reliever for some key middle innings.

Thank you to the OSFM guys for making it possible to pull up real-life ballplayers in the minors when guys are getting hurt at the big league level!!!
 
# 5 sawilson1 @ 04/27/16 10:16 PM
What avg overall rating are you all promoting prospects from triple A?

I try to plan for it, but I want to win now, and wind up signing a veteran than promoting a rookie.
 
# 6 KBLover @ 04/27/16 10:41 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost Of The Year
Just not enough roster spots for position players to go around, esp. for the N.L., when those pinch hitters really are invaluable. I miss the days when 10 pitchers would suffice.
Sometimes I will only carry 11 pitchers instead of 12. Anyone else do this?

Yep. In fact, I made my Rule 5 selection last offseason to take a "6th starter" so he could be the long man/swing man/go whenever I need innings guy.

Let's me go with 11 pitchers and that guy doesn't need to be great because, ideally, I won't use him very much (and if I do in the rotation, he's 5th starter).

That let's me go the back up catcher (Susac), utility infielder (Niko Goodrum), 4th OF (Josh Hart), PH bat (in fact I have two, one that kills lefties, is better with runners on base and another I use in "general" PH situations who's just a good bat, meh defense, and no "special" but no bad areas), and Eric Young, Jr....no idea what you call him but he plays 2B/OF in my carryover. I guess go to PR and plug in guy.

EY's slot is up in the air. But he's holding it down for the moment and nice to let the vet keep playing in the majors.
 
# 7 tessl @ 04/27/16 11:07 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by 24
I always make sure my bench consists of: a backup catcher, a utility infielder, a 4th outfielder and a go to Pinch hitter.
I agree. Stolen bases are glitched this year - perhaps will be fixed in the patch - but I normally keep a guy who can steal a base on the bench. I look for guys who might not have a great overall and thus available in a trade but hit hard vs either rhp or lhp and then platoon them. The most important is hitters who do well against rhp since about 70% of MLB at bats are vs rhp. I also try to give my bench guys at least one start per week.
 
# 8 WillGio @ 04/27/16 11:25 PM
One big tip is really thinking about the contracts you give out to Free Agents. Typically I never sign a contract with a player past his 33 year old season, because I don't want to see a big drop off. So if I sign a player at age 29, I'd probably offer 4 years plus a mutual/club option. Same with extensions too.

Also a big thing is during the offseason, you get to the contract screen, and for the most part, there is a huge budget pool available for you to spend. Some people may see that and say, 'Hey, I can sign 2-3 big contracts', and not worry about the consequences. The problem with that is once your young, star players get into Arbitration and nearing Free Agency, you won't have enough money to retain them. Especially if you're a team like the Astros, Cubs or Mets. Trying to retain the likes of Syndergaard, Degrom, Harvey, or Russell, Bryant, Soler, will be very hard if you have a ton of money locked up in aging veterans.
 
# 9 Lovesports @ 04/27/16 11:41 PM
For me it's pretty simple. Back up catcher a must, one infielder and one outfielder, and then a player with best hitting attributes. If possible I like to have one player that is a complete stud against lefties. That way I give him playing time when I get that lefty starter once in a while. Overall, I like to have a guy or two with good speed, one or two with good/great power, a guy with a very high "clutch" attribute for those game winning moments, one good bunter, and everyone else high contact. I do well with this approach because I don't always need to have the best overall high priced player. Player search is my best friend as I find diamonds in the ruff with attributes that are important to my team. PS, Craig Gentry is a stud and can be traded for pennies. His speed and bunting are out of this world and his contact is no garbage either. I traded a minor league relief pitcher for him to get the speed/bunt guy on my roster and he is now my regular started.
 
# 10 deadlocked @ 04/28/16 08:35 AM
First and foremost try to have no more than 75 active players at one time since A is worthless. A good way to do this is to get rid of anyone 30 and older and/or D potential. Usually you can trade 3 players for a low rated B player.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 
# 11 Flaxseed Oil @ 04/28/16 09:27 AM
I always have a fourth outfielder, usually one with a lot of speed that can pinch run. I try to get a utility infielder that can play multiple positions and I usually try to find one that's a switch hitter, a backup catcher, and a thumper - usually a triple A player who doesnt hit for much average but has lots of pop. Strictly for pinch hitting.

I generally like to only carry 12 pitchers... only one setup man, one long man.
 
# 12 JayD @ 04/28/16 09:28 AM
I know this sounds ridiculous but I generally let the CPU decide my line up, 40 man, call ups, etc. The reason why I do this is so that I don't have an unfair advantage over the CPU controlled teams and so that I'm using the same system as all the CPU controlled teams. The only thing I handle are trades at the start of the free agency period.
 
# 13 Threeebs @ 04/28/16 11:01 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by tessl
I agree. Stolen bases are glitched this year - perhaps will be fixed in the patch - but I normally keep a guy who can steal a base on the bench. I look for guys who might not have a great overall and thus available in a trade but hit hard vs either rhp or lhp and then platoon them. The most important is hitters who do well against rhp since about 70% of MLB at bats are vs rhp. I also try to give my bench guys at least one start per week.
Stolen base glitch huh? I've yet to read about this. What are the details on that one tessl?
 
# 14 jkra0512 @ 04/28/16 11:23 AM
Bench - Backup catcher, fourth outfielder, a utility infielder, and a platoon guy (for my weakest hitter with major splits)

Bullpen - One longman, four middle relief, one setup, one closer

Minors - I go prospects-heavy throughout AAA and AA, since there's no real reason to keep young, lower level prospects (in real life) down in A in The Show, I use them in AAA and AA and let them sink or swim.

Once Sept. call-ups hit or right before them so they have a chance to be on the playoff roster, I reward the players who have done well throughout the year with a trip to The Show, IF they have a chance of making it to the big club next year. For instance, with the Yankees, if Aaron Judge has a good year, he'll come up because he has a chance to take over Beltran's job when he leaves. I don't want to bring up anybody I won't likely use the next season just for the sake of rewarding them, as to not burn one of their options.
 
# 15 HypoLuxa13 @ 04/28/16 11:30 AM
Since, in my opinion, fatigue is a little overdone in The Show, I like to make sure I have every position covered with versatile backups. I like to make sure I don't have single position bench players. I don't want a back up 1st baseman that can only play 1st base, unless I have another back up infielder that can play 2nd, 3rd, and SS. Since defense is penalized so much more for playing out of position this year, I don't have room on my roster for guys who aren't versatile.
 
# 16 tessl @ 04/28/16 11:50 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Threeebs
Stolen base glitch huh? I've yet to read about this. What are the details on that one tessl?
I use manage mode - I can't speak for joystick mode. It is very difficult for even the best base stealers to steal successfully. I suspect the tag animation is the culprit. I suspect the same tag animation cause the high number of runners advancing on a wild pitch being thrown out.
 
# 17 Threeebs @ 04/28/16 11:54 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by tessl
I use manage mode - I can't speak for joystick mode. It is very difficult for even the best base stealers to steal successfully. I suspect the tag animation is the culprit. I suspect the same tag animation cause the high number of runners advancing on a wild pitch being thrown out.
Must only be the case for cpu vs cpu games (or MoM games) because simulation is getting decent stolen base numbers. Maybe use Nomo's simulation sliders for better results?
 
# 18 tessl @ 04/28/16 12:32 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Threeebs
Must only be the case for cpu vs cpu games (or MoM games) because simulation is getting decent stolen base numbers. Maybe use Nomo's simulation sliders for better results?
Nothing against Nomo and his diligent work but I'll wait until the patch to see if it is fixed. The problem is the animation. The animation doesn't exist in sim mode and therefore no problem which gets into another area - stats based progression/regression. The sim engine and game engine produce different results and stats. 29 teams use the sim engine. 1 team - mine - uses the game engine. 29 teams have one progression model. 1 team - mine - has a different progression model.
 
# 19 Black59Razr @ 04/28/16 11:08 PM
I do like to focus on the 25 man roster, like most of the other posts here. As far as the 40 man and full roster, I don't worry much about that until the off season.

If I do sustain an injury, and have to bring someone up, I usually bring up somebody that doesn't have much big league potential (over 26 years old, C potential, etc.) I don't want to start their clock. I keep my bench pretty solid anyway, for situations like this. So, the call-up is gonna be a bench player anyway.

Now, if it's July/August, and you're in the hunt, then you have no choice but to bring up your stud prospect for a few weeks. Especially, if you're going to bring him up next season anyway.

Come the off-season, however, it gets very difficult. And very fun! I have to admit, I use an Excel spreadsheet for my franchise. I have every single player listed, as well as a dozen columns for stuff like OVR, AGE, POT, etc.

You always want to have a 5 year forecast for every position. If you have a 33 year old 3B, you better be thinking about finding a young prospect there. Or, if you have a 24 year old, 83 OVR catcher, you have to seriously consider trading your catching prospect for a 3B.

I never stockpile RPs. It is so easy to find stud RPs in free agency or at the deadline. You also have to take a hard look at your budget. Not just this current year but future years. If you have $30M in cap space this year, look at who is arbitration eligible, free agents, etc. next year. I'll have no problem spending $15M on a 1 year deal for a 90 OVR 38 year old closer. I'll get that money back next year.

Man, there is so many elements to think about. I really love franchise, especially this aspect. And especially if you actually play 100+ games a season. Then, going through all this is so much sweeter! Hmmm, what else... I always have a ton of pitching prospects in my system. I don't trust their durability, so I never have a lot of money invested in them. And I never trade away a good bat for one. I like having 7 quality starting pitchers per season. 2 in the minors that are #3 or #4 quality, and 5 on the 25 man roster that are #2 or #3 quality.

Any position player that is MLB ready but has low durability (under 80) is automatically trade bait. I'd much rather have a 90 durability player that is 5+ OVR worse. And those trades are pretty easy to pull off. But don't trade away very young, high potential players with low durability. They might surprise you and get a huge jump in just a single season.

Always take a look at the trade blocks all season long, whether you are a contender or a seller. There has been a few times, where I was cruising to the Playoffs, and at the trade deadline, traded a good veteran for a stud prospect. No matter where you are in the hunt, sometimes trade offers you get are too good to pass up.

But I would say the key is keeping everything tracked in a spreadsheet. You need to know what you're looking for next season and a few seasons down the road. You need to know where you are heavy and where you are light. I love stocking my minor leagues with a ton of 20 year old, B potential, 62 overall players. By age 24, half of them will be 80+ overall. And if you're lucky, you'll have an entire home grown, stud infield, like the Giants (Posey, Belt, Panik, Crawford, Duffy). Then, you'll have a boat load of money for free agents where you are weak.

I could go on and on for hours. This is hands down my favorite mode in this game, in any game for that matter. There's a lot more, like find high K/9 pitchers, balanced hitters (65-75 in contact and power), high vision and discipline hitters to work high pitch counts from pitchers, great infield D, ignore outfield D ability, platoon corner OFs since there is so many low overall outfielders that can crush just lefties or just righties, etc.
 

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