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Madden NFL 15 News Post



A while back, I did some research on whether QB accuracy attributes made a noticeable difference in the ways quarterback's threw the ball. Over time, the affects were pretty noticeable. Bad QBs had a harder time hitting their targets consistently, and good QBs never had too much trouble. On the surface, it doesn't change the game in a way that it should, but across a decent sample size the difference (statistically) is certainly there.

Unfortunately, not every attribute has been given the same kind of attention. Blocking attributes are easily outweighed by the sliders that represent them. Shifting the pass blocking or run blocking slider up or down has a much greater impact on a player's performance than increasing or decreasing their attributes. The same can be said about virtually all facets of the kicking game.

So the real question is this: which attributes are the most important, and work as they should?

Speed: If nothing else, EA has always represented speed as being an absolute game-changer. Having any player with high speed can be enough to change a game, even if they don't have the other kind of attributes normally needed to field a position.

Release: This is a surprisingly underrated attribute. How quick a wide-receiver can break off of press coverage almost entirely depends on how well this attribute matches up with their opponent. Especially in the red zone, where press coverage is a near must, the release attribute can have a huge impact on the game.

Catching: Again, this has a lot to do with the slider that represents it. That said, the higher a player's catch rating, the more likely they are to make some pretty cool grabs. This also has a definitive impact on your quarterback, as poor pocket passers can be bailed out of some bad throws with awesome catches.

For instance, Jeremy Maclin has the ability to go down and grab a throw towards the dirt, but Josh Huff may struggle to even make a play on it.

Awareness: There's no way to put a finger on exactly what the awareness attribute does, but it has a definite affect on the game. After minimizing this attribute for an entire game for every player on the Patriots, I noticed them reacting like zombies off of blocks and zone coverages. The rating almost certainly doesn't work in a realistic way, but it's importance towards fielding a competitive game is certainly evident.

What are the most attributes to you in Madden NFL 15?

Game: Madden NFL 15Reader Score: 6.5/10 - Vote Now
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Member Comments
# 1 ManiacMatt1782 @ 12/26/14 02:10 PM
For recievers at least, route running is more important than speed, as higher route running is more likely to get you separation.
 
# 2 Armor and Sword @ 12/26/14 02:49 PM
I find CIT (catch in traffic) to be vital for TE's as well as posession WR's.
 
# 3 EarthboundMysfit @ 12/26/14 04:06 PM
Since no ones mentioned it yet, Acceleration (ACC) is a key attribute for every single position, maybe even more so than Speed at certain positions.
 
# 4 ggsimmonds @ 12/26/14 06:33 PM
For me I always value acceleration and agility higher than speed. I would rather consistently gain good yards rather than periodically break a big play.

I agree with release to an extent. Years ago when D. Mason played for the Ravens is an excellent example of this. When I played against "casual" gamers who paid little attention to matchups I would blow them out; but when I played someone who knew to always press Mason it was more of a struggle. However most players do not have release at either extreme (Mason was something like a 55). I think a CB's press rating is more important than release.

Catching -- The drop open passes trait is much more important than the pure catch rating. CIT is more important than regular catch.

Strength -- Most may disagree, but this is huge for linemen. I remember last year's Madden with the wonky rookies being a disaster for my team. I had weird linemen with elite acceleration, moves, speed, etc but horrible strength (75>) and I consistently got shredded by the run game. It was sad how much my guys got pushed back.
 
# 5 rkocjay @ 12/26/14 08:58 PM
to me CIT, all speed attribute, Hit power, Tackle, and throw power just to name a few.

ive had WR with mid 60 and 70 CiT drop the ball when they are hit almost every time
A higher hit power seen to cause more fumble(of course)
A bad Tackle attribute will get that defender beat every time
Throw power of course for the deep passes
 
# 6 ggsimmonds @ 12/26/14 09:24 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by rkocjay
to me CIT, all speed attribute, Hit power, Tackle, and throw power just to name a few.

ive had WR with mid 60 and 70 CiT drop the ball when they are hit almost every time
A higher hit power seen to cause more fumble(of course)
A bad Tackle attribute will get that defender beat every time
Throw power of course for the deep passes
I disagree with throw power. Yes it helps having elite thp, but I can still have success with a QB with average arm strength, just have to alter the playcalling. Throw power's influence is most evident on bullet passes, on a deep lob there is not much difference between 88 thp and 95+. The DAC is far more important in the deep game.
 
# 7 KingV2k3 @ 12/27/14 10:51 AM
AWR is the FIRST choice by quite a margin, IMHO...

Firstly, the CPU's defensive AWR is affected by the HUM QB AWR on all offensive snaps and the HB AWR triggers it on run plays...

Easy test:

Boot up a game with DEN, use Manning / observe loose, poor coverage, then switch to backup and see defense play much smarter / tighter...

Same with HBs...

It's a universal modifier of defensive AWR in the previous examples...

Lastly, AWR modifies just about every attribute for All 22...

AWR, by a mile...no contest...

BCV is also an interesting modifier, in that high number = big holes versus low numbers = small holes that close quickly...
 
# 8 timhere1970 @ 12/29/14 07:56 AM
I agree with awareness being the most important and ironically it is easy to upgrade. Acceleration for pass rushing dlinemen, linebackers, tight ends and slot receivers.
 
# 9 NicVirtue @ 12/30/14 03:41 PM
Speed. You don't need Awareness if you have 99 Speed as a WR. That DB could have 99 awareness, if he has 87 speed, he's getting burnt every single time.
 
# 10 BuckeyesForDays @ 12/30/14 03:51 PM
For Running Backs and Receivers it is Speed, I only field a Receiver if he has 90+ Speed, also Trucking is up there for Backs. I don't like the jukes in this so I prefer quick power backs. QB is Accuracy. Simply because if he isn't accurate more pics are going to be thrown. TE's is Catching, I look for my tight end to make big catches on 3rd down and long or in the endzone. LB's is Speed also. Others i dont really care. It depends on what I feel like I can mold.
 
# 11 TMalone2010 @ 02/19/15 03:49 PM
power move , block shed and acceleration are what I focus on for pass rushers

Tacking , power hit , block shed and speed for line backers

Power hit , speed and zone coverage for safety's

Zone coverage , speed and tacking for corners
 
# 12 TMalone2010 @ 02/19/15 03:51 PM
Running backs I worry about speed, carrying and break tackle

Wide recievers it's about release catch in traffic and speed

Quarterback is throw power and throw on run

Tight ends is CIT and speed
 
# 13 Jr. @ 02/19/15 05:33 PM
After multiple seasons in an online CFM.. the most important attribute in my opinion is Confidence. Low confidence can take an excellent player and make them the worst player on the field.

You get a full team of low confidence players.... good luck doing much of anything, no matter their original ratings.
 
# 14 2w0 @ 02/19/15 09:26 PM
Since the basics have already been talked about, I'd like to mention some that haven't been...

For HB, Elusiveness and Ball Carrier Vision are huge. I use a lot of run-up-the-gut plays, and my favorites are the various 01 Trap plays in the Minnesota playbook. I've run these Trap plays over 1,000 times, and it's ridiculous how brutal they are when coupled with a One Cut back or a Power Back. Because of how nasty these Trap plays are, I completely avoid Speed Backs in Free Agency, because running up the gut in M15 is, in my experience, much more effective than outside runs, which is quite the departure from every Madden previously released. And if you're too fast when running up the middle, you'll outrun your blockers and get lit up by every LB on the field.

I scout Elusiveness now because it's expensive to upgrade (BCV is cheap). It's easy to test how important these are, just run up the middle with any One Cut or Power Back (I like Dallas or Minnesota) until your guy gets tired and your Speed Back comes in and totally ****in sucks.

If you don't use Trap plays, do yourself a favor and add them in and practice them at least 100 times with the right running back. Audible to a Slant any time they have a defender in the A Gap. Don't use Sprint until you've run past the LB's and you're trying to outrun the Safeties. When you're just starting to use these plays, focus on memorizing where your O-Line is going to set up their blocks dependant on where the LB's are standing, and figure out where the open hole is going to be.
 
# 15 phenomenal_waffles @ 02/20/15 04:23 AM
every position: speed
 
# 16 NoleFan @ 02/20/15 10:49 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingV2k3
AWR is the FIRST choice by quite a margin, IMHO...

Firstly, the CPU's defensive AWR is affected by the HUM QB AWR on all offensive snaps and the HB AWR triggers it on run plays...

Easy test:

Boot up a game with DEN, use Manning / observe loose, poor coverage, then switch to backup and see defense play much smarter / tighter...

Same with HBs...

It's a universal modifier of defensive AWR in the previous examples...

Lastly, AWR modifies just about every attribute for All 22...

AWR, by a mile...no contest...

BCV is also an interesting modifier, in that high number = big holes versus low numbers = small holes that close quickly...
I gotta agree with this. Because I don't control any of the players save for K/P, I must make sure AWR, PRC, BCV and those types of ratings are at least decent before a guy gets onto the field.
 
# 17 LBzrule @ 02/20/15 11:39 AM
I think they have toned down speed on offense some. I have a WR in CFM right now with 97 Acc and 96 speed and he cannot get any separation whatsoever against slow CB's on go routes. Speed threshold doesn't work properly.
 
# 18 LBzrule @ 02/20/15 11:42 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by NicVirtue
Speed. You don't need Awareness if you have 99 Speed as a WR. That DB could have 99 awareness, if he has 87 speed, he's getting burnt every single time.
I've experienced the exact opposite. I have a damn track team in CFM and I cannot take the top off of a defense. I can't even get one of them to run past a DB in single coverage on a go route. Pass placement is a problem and separation is also a problem.
 
# 19 NoleFan @ 02/20/15 01:04 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by LBzrule
I've experienced the exact opposite. I have a damn track team in CFM and I cannot take the top off of a defense. I can't even get one of them to run past a DB in single coverage on a go route. Pass placement is a problem and separation is also a problem.
@LBzrule
Does difficulty level factor into that lack of speed differential with your 90+ speed guys?
 
# 20 the veteran @ 02/28/15 09:12 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingV2k3
AWR is the FIRST choice by quite a margin, IMHO...

Firstly, the CPU's defensive AWR is affected by the HUM QB AWR on all offensive snaps and the HB AWR triggers it on run plays...

Easy test:

Boot up a game with DEN, use Manning / observe loose, poor coverage, then switch to backup and see defense play much smarter / tighter...

Same with HBs...

It's a universal modifier of defensive AWR in the previous examples...

Lastly, AWR modifies just about every attribute for All 22...

AWR, by a mile...no contest...

BCV is also an interesting modifier, in that high number = big holes versus low numbers = small holes that close quickly...
Would definitely need to see more studies on this to prove that.
 

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