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NCAA Football 14 News Post



The coming shift on major issues when it comes to 'student-athlete welfare' within the NCAA power structure can be seen coming from a mile away.

This week, the NCAA is holding its annual convention and one of the items up for debate is a proposal for large changes within the Division I power structure. Up for debate is the proposal by the Power-Five conferences (ACC, Big 12, Big Ten, Pac 12, SEC) to be granted more autonomy in how they are allowed to operate.

You may remember this past summer, each commissioner within the Power Five made public comments about their dissatisfaction with the current setup.

At issue is the ability of the bigger and wealthier schools to meet "21st Century Needs" for student-athletes, which the biggest and most wealthy schools are unable to do according to their claims.

Things on the table include stipends for players, paying for travel for parents to games, 'lifetime' education opportunities, and more. What is not on the table is a pay-for-play model apparently, and a wholly separate division seems unlikely.

What does seem likely is a relaxation of what can and cannot be done for players and players' parents, and things which are clear violations of NCAA rules now might not be violations in the future.

This shift towards a more welcoming format could encourage the Power Five schools to reconsider their stance when it comes to video games as well in the future, but their need to act fast will be imperative. There would likely be interest from both schools and from EA to revive EA's college football title, which always sold well, within a format where litigation was no longer a risk.

At the end of the day, this move from the Power Five is being made because of the threat of litigation from student athletes who feel they are not being reimbursed properly. Since the NCAA series was canned due to ongoing litigation, it's entirely possible that if and when that threat is gone, the series could be revived in the future.

We will, of course, be keeping an eye on this to see if the possibility of college video games returning becomes reality into the future.

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Member Comments
# 1 champ1997 @ 01/15/14 02:34 PM
I had Hi hopes for this game on next-gen
 
# 2 BenGerman @ 01/15/14 03:34 PM
This was a big talking point when EA first decided to cancel the series. Would things change if players received some kind of compensation for their play? Probably. Would it eventually get to the point where players would received compensation for their play? Probably.

So in the perfect world (for those of us who want NCAA to come back), we need those two things to fall in line. Somehow, I suspect we won't be without a college sports video game for any more than a few years.
 
# 3 MrRudy @ 01/15/14 06:34 PM
I have sort of sat back and just observed this whole mess. Felt pretty down for a bit when the word came down about the game, but I just feel like college football is too big of a cash cow for this to last more than a few years.

It was probably wise for EA to pull the plug, sit out while this whole player compensation fiasco untangles itself. When the storm has calmed, come back, line the pockets of the right people and bring the franchise back to life.

I don't know, maybe it's just wishful thinking on my part.
 
# 4 SpeedyMikeWallace @ 01/15/14 09:46 PM
Just separate football from the NCAA already. It's inevitable, Mr. Anderson.

As for the game, we need a return to more than one developer. It would be better for us if competition existed again, we wouldn't get stuck with such an obviously static product. It's not just EA, it happens with every monopolized product. Competition breeds innovations.
 
# 5 jsl05 @ 01/15/14 10:08 PM
Would this at all impact the NCAA Basketball video game?
 
# 6 AlterEgoDuane @ 01/20/14 02:25 AM
One issue that people are not discussing in any articles I have read regarding this issue is the law, Title IX. The Big 5 conferences want all these perks and what not and people seem to think that a "pay-for-play" is inevitable, but it's not. Title IX says that women must be treated equally to men, especially when it comes to athletics. So, if you are going to pay a football player a stipend, you must pay the same stipend to a female gymnast. Not only that, but that's why there are usually more women's sports than men's at most schools. Football uses 85 scholarships at the FBS level. Therefore, you must have women's sports who equal the same amount of scholarships, etc.

So, let's not try and proclaim that pay for play is close. It's not, by law.
 
# 7 SpeedyMikeWallace @ 01/20/14 03:40 AM
Since paying them would by all means make these players professionals, title IX would not even matter.
 
# 8 mjavon @ 01/20/14 01:04 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlterEgoDuane
One issue that people are not discussing in any articles I have read regarding this issue is the law, Title IX. The Big 5 conferences want all these perks and what not and people seem to think that a "pay-for-play" is inevitable, but it's not. Title IX says that women must be treated equally to men, especially when it comes to athletics. So, if you are going to pay a football player a stipend, you must pay the same stipend to a female gymnast. Not only that, but that's why there are usually more women's sports than men's at most schools. Football uses 85 scholarships at the FBS level. Therefore, you must have women's sports who equal the same amount of scholarships, etc.



So, let's not try and proclaim that pay for play is close. It's not, by law.

Major universities would probably be able to accommodate non-football athletes too with minimal budget concerns. My main question is how this would give these Power Five schools a competitive advantage over schools that are not as wealthy and thus, may not be able to accommodate all of its athletes in such a way.
 

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