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NCAA Football 14 News Post



You read that headline right. As the Ed O'Bannon vs. the NCAA lawsuit continues onwards in the courts, both sides are jockeying for what could be a blockbuster trial by next summer.

In a recently filed study, EA and the College Licensing Company (CLC) claim that less than 25% of all men's basketball and football players were actually represented in EA's college athletic video games with their correct height, weight, home state and position.

EA and the CLC, while arguing against the fact they don't use college athletes is claiming that they do in fact use some college athlete likenesses right down to their correct height, weight, home state and position. This seems highly counterproductive simply because we don't know the exact boundaries for how the study was done. If it required an exact match, then a player being 10-20 pounds too heavy or light would mean they weren't exactly represented, which seems to actually indicate more players than claimed are actually somewhat well represented within the game.

Earlier in the winter, it was revealed that some NCAA e-mails tend to indicate that they knew about the use (but not use) of players likenesses in all but name.

"The issue for me is that the names and likenesses are rigged into the games now by illegal means, meaning that many of the video game players have the features, it's just that our membership doesn't benefit from it," then NCAA Vice President Greg Shaheen wrote.

The e-mails also revealed that the NCAA and EA have looked at trying to find ways to include real player names into the games, with no definitive ways to pull that feat off just yet.

Thanks to the O'Bannon lawsuit, talk about whether to pay college football players is becoming a hot topic. This morning, Oklahoma Head Coach Bob Stoops chimed in, "I donít get why people say these guys donít get paid. Itís simple, they are paid quite often, quite a bit and quite handsomely."

The O'Bannon and Sam Keller lawsuit alleges that the NCAA and EA Sports, amongst other entities, have been illegally profiting off of college athletes likenesses with no direct return to the athletes. This is an exceptionally important case which we have been following for several years now, as EA Sports stands to lose $1 billion if an unfavorable ruling for EA is handed down.

It is our position that if Keller and O'Bannon do prevail, college football video games will likely cease to exist due to much higher licensing costs and little return on investment.

Where do you stand on this case as of right now?

Game: NCAA Football 14Reader Score: 8/10 - Vote Now
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Member Comments
# 1 PVarck31 @ 04/10/13 12:40 PM
Just another game circling the drain.
 
# 2 The_Wise_One @ 04/10/13 12:52 PM
This can't end good
 
# 3 Bmore Irish @ 04/10/13 12:56 PM
i guess we better hope NCAA 14 turns out to be the enhanced game we've all been waiting for, could be the last
 
# 4 buckeyedawgtribe @ 04/10/13 12:59 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bmore Irish 69
i guess we better hope NCAA 14 turns out to be the enhanced game we've all been waiting for, could be the last
agree...i will be getting back on the NCAA horse. this game may end up being the new 2K8 college hoops game in that we may be playing and upgrading it for years
 
# 5 guitar4468 @ 04/10/13 01:04 PM
I'm still confused why we can see a player on TV, on interviews, highlights for TV, Magazines, etc. Yet their name or likeness in a video game is over the lines?

Secondly, these players did not have to play football. They could live their lives normally if they want. They know what they signed up for. Free school, food, room and board, healthcare, some spending money, grants, and a chance at the NFL. If the players win, they might be screwing over future athletes.
 
# 6 Jr. @ 04/10/13 01:13 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by guitar4468
I'm still confused why we can see a player on TV, on interviews, highlights for TV, Magazines, etc. Yet their name or likeness in a video game is over the lines?
This particular lawsuit is dealing with EA and their videogames, but if it passes the precedent will affect many other areas.
 
# 7 lowercasecurtis @ 04/10/13 01:15 PM
This Greg Shaheen seems like one greedy douche. Likeness is being added illegally, please, it's not like the game is being hacked to add in names. All I'm reading is "we (NCAA) aren't getting even more money than we already are, and we clearly need more money so I, I mean we, can buy a new yacht."

I still believe this lawsuit isn't so much about the players getting paid but NCAA execs lining their pockets.
 
# 8 BadAssHskr @ 04/10/13 01:16 PM
let's face it, things like sambo keller, and other are used up, dried out, failed, has beens looking for a buck and a chance to pretend they matter one last time in their pathetic existence.
 
# 9 bad_philanthropy @ 04/10/13 01:32 PM
Hilarious that the NCAA sells their license to EA in order to make money and increase their product's reach, and EA implements a feature like the ability to edit players as an enticement attracting more consumers, and then the NCAA complains that this is illegal. Editing players is pretty much a universal feature in sports games these days. Maybe they should have researched the nature of the product more before agreeing to sell the license for representation in a video game. The amount of advertising and profile schools and NCAA football get out of this game with younger and college aged kids is insane. I remember when I was at UO the game was a ubiquitous part of the student culture.

The other poster was right. Just Sam Keller and other has-beens trying to make a buck. Just sell your insurance or used cars and let it go dude. Not everyone gets to be Peyton Manning.
 
# 10 SilverChaosVII @ 04/10/13 01:39 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by guitar4468
I'm still confused why we can see a player on TV, on interviews, highlights for TV, Magazines, etc. Yet their name or likeness in a video game is over the lines?

Secondly, these players did not have to play football. They could live their lives normally if they want. They know what they signed up for. Free school, food, room and board, healthcare, some spending money, grants, and a chance at the NFL. If the players win, they might be screwing over future athletes.
I think it's safe to say that 90% of athletes don't care at all. Actually, most of them probably enjoy it.

The NCAA is just out to make money. Anything that EA is forced to pay would never make it to the players anyway.

It's just the corruption that is the NCAA. It's a business that's only looking to profit. They act like it's all about "the kids" but it's not. It's just about them making money.
 
# 11 BenGerman @ 04/10/13 01:46 PM
I know the consensus is that this wont end well for EA, but from what I've looked at, it seems like Keller and co. are grasping at straws a little bit. We'll see.

As others have mentioned, this is hypocrisy at its very worst.
 
# 12 LowerWolf @ 04/10/13 01:53 PM
EA really shouldn't be able to use the likenesses of college players in their games. And it's pretty clear they do.

But the NCAA shouldn't be able to plaster corporate logos all over their events. And it's pretty clear they do.
 
# 13 RandyBass @ 04/10/13 02:03 PM
Quote:
Earlier in the winter, it was revealed that some NCAA e-mails tend to indicate that they knew about the use (but not use) of players likenesses in all but name.
Is this like uh... Like uh... Zen koan or something?
 
# 14 bpd115 @ 04/10/13 02:18 PM
So say they win. Isn't the solution simply for EA to give us a built in powerful roster editor, but ship the game with computer generated rosters? Give a team an overall rating for Offense, Defense, etc. then let the computer generate the rosters to match that overall.
 
# 15 inkcil @ 04/10/13 02:39 PM
Pay them already...the "value" of an education is highly subjective. The value of a dollar...not so much.
 
# 16 Big FN Deal @ 04/10/13 02:41 PM
"What's even more interesting is that EA has hired people to work directly on the NCAA rosters in the past to make them as close to the real thing as possible".

Since they have never been able to use names, this must be referring to physical or ratings likeness or both, either way, GTFOH, lol. The roster creators in the community are the ones that have gotten these rosters as close to the real thing possible, not anyone EA hired, that I am aware of.
 
# 17 cuttingteeth @ 04/10/13 02:58 PM
No likenesses means, they need to make them look like glitched/UDFA guys in Madden 12 or from Blitz games..? That would suck and destroy the game ever selling again...ever.

Seriously, if they allow for you to DL as many teambuilder schools as you want, then they can make the game as generic per rosters as they want...and those sim folks of us will do all the rest of the work (like we do already, honestly).
 
# 18 mestevo @ 04/10/13 03:09 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bamantic
I will be so disappointed if this lawsuit results in no more college football games because people want more money over bs.
Not just college football games but potentially any other collegiate sport too unless some kind of licensing is figured out.
 
# 19 BV11 @ 04/10/13 03:11 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by bpd115
So say they win. Isn't the solution simply for EA to give us a built in powerful roster editor, but ship the game with computer generated rosters? Give a team an overall rating for Offense, Defense, etc. then let the computer generate the rosters to match that overall.
Hopefully.
 
# 20 BJNT @ 04/10/13 03:26 PM
I've said it before and I'll say it again. Kids that are on academic scholarships and band scholarships are getting the same free education, room and board, etc that kids on athletic scholarships are. The only difference, the kids on band and academic scholarships are allowed to make money off of their own image and the ones that are on athletic scholarships are not. That needs to be corrected.
 

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