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MLB 11 The Show News Post


Jon Robinson has posted an outstanding read on MLB 11 The Show adding controls for the disabled virtual athletes.

Quote:
"Hans Smith pitched his way through an up-and-down rookie year for the Cardinals last season.

Don't recognize the name? That's because Smith is a virtual athlete who spent an entire season playing as himself in "MLB 10: The Show."

But Smith is anything but your average gamer.

The 25-year-old baseball fanatic suffers from cerebral palsy, making it impossible for him to play the game he loves in real life.

But that didn't stop Smith from making the Majors.

You see, a few years ago, Smith wrote a letter to Sony's San Diego studio, the developers of the top-rated "MLB: The Show" series, and the producers were so moved by Smith's passionate words about the sport of baseball, the Cardinals, and their video game, that Sony went ahead and created Smith's character in "MLB 10: The Show."

And according to Smith, seeing the cyber version of himself gave him a feeling like never before. It was as if by some miracle, his cerebral palsy ceased to exist nine innings at a time.

A feeling Smith wants to share with other disabled gamers."

Game: MLB 11 The ShowReader Score: 8.5/10 - Vote Now
Platform: PS3Votes for game: 57 - View All
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Member Comments
# 1 Rase @ 01/24/11 01:17 PM
Standing O for the San Diego crew,Hans !!!

That The Show picture of his looks great
 
# 2 mgjohns61585 @ 01/24/11 01:29 PM
Thank you for posting...Great article for a great cause...
 
# 3 Jgainsey @ 01/24/11 01:39 PM
Really cool.

Hopefully Hans will drop by again this year and let us know what he's up to, and what he thinks of the new game.
 
# 4 HITTERSAURUS REX @ 01/24/11 03:02 PM
Great read.. SCEA MLB people deserve some type of Humanity Award and/or World wide televised recoginition about this.
 
# 5 Dazraz @ 01/24/11 03:05 PM
A tremendous story. It's great to read something so positive about videogames & how they can give everyone the opportunity to live out there dreams even if it's only in a virtual world. Hat's off to Sony for taking the time out to put Hans in the game.
 
# 6 Jeffster @ 01/24/11 03:55 PM
"You only have one rookie year in the game, just like real life, but I didn't do too well. I had 9 wins and 11 losses with an ERA of 4.51 and 107 strikeouts," he says. "I love the fact that I didn't have a good year, though, because it proves that you can't just go out and win every game. You have to work at it."

That's actually a pretty darn good rookie year, Hans! Don't be so hard on yourself.
 
# 7 Doormat @ 01/24/11 04:01 PM
Oh I remember this last year, still an inspiring story :'(
Great job guys )))!!
 
# 8 ckarlic @ 01/24/11 04:11 PM
Awesome story!!!
 
# 9 ARMORALLL @ 01/24/11 04:19 PM
I remember Hans. Cheers to the fellows at SDS for doing this!
 
# 10 jestep123 @ 01/24/11 04:47 PM
I totally understand this. This is a great story and a great way to get disabled individuals involved.

I also have Cerebral Palsy so I totally understand where this guy is coming from. I am 35 years old and I am starting to grow out of video games a little bit (I play mostly with my 5 year old now) but I totally understand this.

Imagine being as competitive as you are. Then imagine having to live without being able to do anything about it. All the while, having to watch friends and others around you have a chance to compete. It is very tough, especially on the younger disabled kids. There is no way to overstate that. It's not a pity party but it is a fact of life. For that reason alone, you have to applaud SDS for listening and implementing this.
 
# 11 DubTrey1 @ 01/24/11 05:24 PM
This is simply awesome. You gotta love the devs for stepping up and doing something like this.
 
# 12 countryboy @ 01/24/11 06:35 PM
Wonderful, wonderful story!

You know, its funny, you read the forums, and all of us are asking for this or that and wondering when it will be in and why it hasn't been implemented as of yet. And then you read a story such as this, and you quickly realize just how "lucky" we are to be asking for all these extra details, when there are those who are just wanting a chance to play the game.

I salute SCEA for taking the time to add something for all of their fans. You guys are truly appreciated for your hard work and listening to your fans, but now I feel as though you guys should be admired for the fact that you listen to your fans and geniunely care about them.

Its both a joy and an honor to be able to have open discussions with such dedicated, passionate, and geniunely caring developers.
 
# 13 DJ @ 01/24/11 06:59 PM
That was a great story, and as Countryboy says, it really helps put things into perspective.

I liked Hans' idea of actually sitting out, so to speak, while he was injured and just watching games until his virtual player healed.

A big tip of the cap to the SCEA crew, and to Hans for creating his organization for disabled gamers. I think it's great that those avenues are being explored in the gaming world.
 
# 14 NYJin2009tm @ 01/24/11 07:25 PM
One of the many reasons why SDS is the best!
 
# 15 ffyfe7 @ 01/25/11 03:18 AM
Fantastic story! I have Cerebral Palsy but it is only minor and in my legs so it doesn't effect my gaming. I play baseball for my local club and I am very fortunate that is wasn't as bad as it could have been. I hate it when I can't do something due to my disability but I always try my hardest, it was they way I was brought up. I never though of how disabled gamers tried to play games but when they can't physically play a sport it must be tough.

Again fantastic job by SDS and SCEA, now we can all "play ball"

P.S - Would you be able to ship the game to Australia?
 
# 16 CoreGMRConMan @ 01/25/11 06:24 AM
I am a disabled gamer as well. Maybe as severe as Hans. I have Arthrogryposis which is similar to cerebal paulsey. I can't use the L2 button or the left trigger on the 360 without severe pain. I usually use my mouth or nose to pull th trigger if i need to. As for the Wii? Forget about it. I can't even hold the controller properly. I understand that games and some gamers are moving towards that type of gaming, but it is leaving disabled gamers in the dust.

I adapt the world to fit my needs. I have just graduated with a Bachelor's in Journalism, I run two semi busy sites and write everyday. I also game everyday. I play on HOF and have completed my season. These types of actions by Show developers are leaps and bounds better than anything other developers are offering. I have been contacting developers for years to get help. The community as well at Ablegamers.com have been trying to work with developers for years to no real avail.

In the simplest form, the one thing that would make gaming for the disabled obtainable would be button mapping. Thats it. But developers who fear wrath from competitive gaming leagues such as MLG do not implement this into their games for fear of cheating. They even banned the Razer Onza, a controller for the 360 which allows mapping of two extra shoulder buttons, from MLG. The Onza is a blessing for me since I cant reach the left trigger but could map it to the right-shoulder.

For a game like The Show, button mapping wouldn't really be effective. I speak more in terms of FPS and action games.

Button Mapping would allow gamers with disabilities the option of tailoring the game to fit their needs. What the Show developers are doing is also a HUGE step forward. They realized what I stated above, that button mapping for the game would be ineffective and devised a way to make it accessible.

I have no doubt that the team will make these options perfect, just look at the game. But I would urge Russell or any of the team that are reading this to please spread the word to OTHER development teams to follow suit. DAMN the competitive gaming leagues and their rules. DAMN online multi-player advantages (you can't restrict control sets online? Please). DAMN trending motion controlling. Games are supposed to be an escape from reality. And who better to cherish that escape then people with disabilities. when the games we want to play are like that damn L2, "out-of-reach", it sucks.

You can read all about me at http://www.wadesxb.com
And check out http://www.ablegamers.com

And if this post does reach someone of importance, I would love to be ambassador for disabled gamers to developers.
 
# 17 bd7961 @ 01/25/11 03:57 PM
I'm a disabled gamer myself. Lost the use of my left arm to a stroke when I was 32. Hats off to Sony for doing this.

Brian
 
# 18 Russell_SCEA @ 01/25/11 04:04 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by CoreGMRConMan
I am a disabled gamer as well. Maybe as severe as Hans. I have Arthrogryposis which is similar to cerebal paulsey. I can't use the L2 button or the left trigger on the 360 without severe pain. I usually use my mouth or nose to pull th trigger if i need to. As for the Wii? Forget about it. I can't even hold the controller properly. I understand that games and some gamers are moving towards that type of gaming, but it is leaving disabled gamers in the dust.

I adapt the world to fit my needs. I have just graduated with a Bachelor's in Journalism, I run two semi busy sites and write everyday. I also game everyday. I play on HOF and have completed my season. These types of actions by Show developers are leaps and bounds better than anything other developers are offering. I have been contacting developers for years to get help. The community as well at Ablegamers.com have been trying to work with developers for years to no real avail.

In the simplest form, the one thing that would make gaming for the disabled obtainable would be button mapping. Thats it. But developers who fear wrath from competitive gaming leagues such as MLG do not implement this into their games for fear of cheating. They even banned the Razer Onza, a controller for the 360 which allows mapping of two extra shoulder buttons, from MLG. The Onza is a blessing for me since I cant reach the left trigger but could map it to the right-shoulder.

For a game like The Show, button mapping wouldn't really be effective. I speak more in terms of FPS and action games.

Button Mapping would allow gamers with disabilities the option of tailoring the game to fit their needs. What the Show developers are doing is also a HUGE step forward. They realized what I stated above, that button mapping for the game would be ineffective and devised a way to make it accessible.

I have no doubt that the team will make these options perfect, just look at the game. But I would urge Russell or any of the team that are reading this to please spread the word to OTHER development teams to follow suit. DAMN the competitive gaming leagues and their rules. DAMN online multi-player advantages (you can't restrict control sets online? Please). DAMN trending motion controlling. Games are supposed to be an escape from reality. And who better to cherish that escape then people with disabilities. when the games we want to play are like that damn L2, "out-of-reach", it sucks.

You can read all about me at http://www.wadesxb.com
And check out http://www.ablegamers.com

And if this post does reach someone of importance, I would love to be ambassador for disabled gamers to developers.

I'll make sure to send out an email to all our First party developers in the SCEA family.
 
# 19 CoreGMRConMan @ 01/26/11 04:50 AM
 

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